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Oct 1, 2021

Is It My Eyes Or Has The World Become A Darker Place?

Keith Scott-Mumby

My eyesight has always been quite good. OK, I don’t have 20/20 anymore but I don’t have cataracts, macular degeneration or glaucoma, according to my ophthalmologist! Yet I see darkly. You will not convince me that the world has not become more sinister, dangerous and evil. There really is no such thing as a COVID […] The post Is It My Eyes Or Has The World Become A Darker Place? appeared first on Dr. Keith Scott-Mumby.

Jul 18, 2013

Doctoring Vaccination Facts Instead of Patient Care

Keith Scott-Mumby

A paper just published asserts no association between Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and vaccinations. But some of us say it doesn’t show anything much. Vaccines Not Linked to Guillain-Barre, Asserts 13-Year Trial. That’s what the headline said. But, it wasn’t a trial at all; it was just a review of records. In a paper just published online April 11, 2013, and in the July 15 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, researchers claimed to have examined records spanning 13 years and more than 30 million person-years and found no evidence of an increased risk for Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) after vaccinations of any type, including influenza vaccination. Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? Must be true maybe? Point one to note: the lead author, Roger Baxter, MD, is co-director of the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center, Oakland, California. That’s an immediate red flag. Point two: it’s a retrospective study. It’s easy to manipulate figures from the past… you just choose the ones you like! Point three: causes of this syndrome are largely unknown, but are thought to involve an autoimmune process triggered by antigenic stimulation that results in demyelination and destruction of peripheral nerves. Well, we know for sure, from veterinary studies, that vaccines are a major cause—if not THE cause—of autoimmune diseases in cats and dogs. So that’s a glaring inconsistency in their position: vaccinations cause autoimmune disease. So “causes largely unknown” is being too cute. What was interesting was that they found about two thirds of cases (66.7%) were preceded by a gastrointestinal or respiratory infection, with Campylobacter enteritis being the most common trigger. Also implicated are influenza, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, HIV, and Mycoplasma pneumonia. The trouble is, despite the thunderous sounding numbers in my second paragraph, the researchers looked at just 415 cases. That’s stickpoint number four (these are adding up!) Among the 415 patients with GBS they found (or were they chosen?), only 25 had received any vaccine in the 6 weeks before onset of the disease. The other 390 patients with GBS received no vaccines in the 6 weeks before onset. So in a sense it’s a series of 25! Not enough. Stickpoint number #5. More reassuring is the fact that the researchers also found no cases of GBS resulting from vaccines given in childhood, despite the large number of doses given. These included the oral polio vaccine (1.2 million doses), measles-mumps-rubella (1.6 million), conjugated pneumococcal (1.3 million), live attenuated influenza (69,000), diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (1.9 million), varicella (764,000), Haemophilus-diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (525,000), and Haemophilus B vaccines (1.2 million). It does seem clear that GBS is a disease of older people (50 plus years). BUT… remember these are Kaiser’s own records. The fact that there was no mentioned association could be dumb doctors… or dishonest doctors, who don’t or can’t report accurately. GBS really is rare. But here’s another sticky point: according to the US Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, there is a “background rate” for GBS in the U.S. of about 80 to 160 cases of GBS each week. So how come Kaiser, with huge resources and what was claimed to be 30 million person-years, came up with only 415 cases over a span of 13 years? Is that believable? That stinks of massaging. In any case, as I said, this is such a small series as to be almost meaningless.

Jul 18, 2013

Doctoring Vaccination Facts Instead of Patient Care

Keith Scott-Mumby

A paper just published asserts no association between Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and vaccinations. But some of us say it doesn’t show anything much. Vaccines Not Linked to Guillain-Barre, Asserts 13-Year Trial. That’s what the headline said. But, it wasn’t a trial at all; it was just a review of records. In a paper just published online April 11, 2013, and in the July 15 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, researchers claimed to have examined records spanning 13 years and more than 30 million person-years and found no evidence of an increased risk for Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) after vaccinations of any type, including influenza vaccination. Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? Must be true maybe? Point one to note: the lead author, Roger Baxter, MD, is co-director of the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center, Oakland, California. That’s an immediate red flag. Point two: it’s a retrospective study. It’s easy to manipulate figures from the past… you just choose the ones you like! Point three: causes of this syndrome are largely unknown, but are thought to involve an autoimmune process triggered by antigenic stimulation that results in demyelination and destruction of peripheral nerves. Well, we know for sure, from veterinary studies, that vaccines are a major cause—if not THE cause—of autoimmune diseases in cats and dogs. So that’s a glaring inconsistency in their position: vaccinations cause autoimmune disease. So “causes largely unknown” is being too cute. What was interesting was that they found about two thirds of cases (66.7%) were preceded by a gastrointestinal or respiratory infection, with Campylobacter enteritis being the most common trigger. Also implicated are influenza, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, HIV, and Mycoplasma pneumonia. The trouble is, despite the thunderous sounding numbers in my second paragraph, the researchers looked at just 415 cases. That’s stickpoint number four (these are adding up!) Among the 415 patients with GBS they found (or were they chosen?), only 25 had received any vaccine in the 6 weeks before onset of the disease. The other 390 patients with GBS received no vaccines in the 6 weeks before onset. So in a sense it’s a series of 25! Not enough. Stickpoint number #5. More reassuring is the fact that the researchers also found no cases of GBS resulting from vaccines given in childhood, despite the large number of doses given. These included the oral polio vaccine (1.2 million doses), measles-mumps-rubella (1.6 million), conjugated pneumococcal (1.3 million), live attenuated influenza (69,000), diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (1.9 million), varicella (764,000), Haemophilus-diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (525,000), and Haemophilus B vaccines (1.2 million). It does seem clear that GBS is a disease of older people (50 plus years). BUT… remember these are Kaiser’s own records. The fact that there was no mentioned association could be dumb doctors… or dishonest doctors, who don’t or can’t report accurately. GBS really is rare. But here’s another sticky point: according to the US Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, there is a “background rate” for GBS in the U.S. of about 80 to 160 cases of GBS each week. So how come Kaiser, with huge resources and what was claimed to be 30 million person-years, came up with only 415 cases over a span of 13 years? Is that believable? That stinks of massaging. In any case, as I said, this is such a small series as to be almost meaningless.

Apr 30, 2012

Deaths From Measles Falling Rapidly But Why?

Keith Scott-Mumby

It would be a bad doctor who said, “So what?” we shouldn’t vaccinate. It needs thinking about carefully in context It appears that deaths from measles are falling rapidly. That’s cause for celebration. Measles is pretty deadly, never forget that. For sure, part of this decline is misdiagnosing the real cause of death. But I accept a genuine decline. The researchers found measles deaths worldwide fell from more than 535,000 in 2000 to around 139,000 in 2010. That’s a pretty big fall off (75% drop). We can’t put everything down to faking results. The big question is: how much of the fall is due to the measles vaccination program? How much of it would happen anyway? It is idle (and stupid) to simply dismiss any benefits, just because the measles vaccine seems very likely implicated in toxic nerve inflammations afterwards. If there is good and there is harm, the question is: do they balance? No deaths is good. Would you rather have no deaths and autism? Or would you rather have the deaths than risk that any medical interference might trigger autism? If you think the answer is easy, you either don’t understand the question, or you are ignorant and prejudiced, in my view. It’s a very difficult epidemiological question and it polarizes even holistic doctors.

Apr 30, 2012

Deaths From Measles Falling Rapidly But Why?

Keith Scott-Mumby

It would be a bad doctor who said, “So what?” we shouldn’t vaccinate. It needs thinking about carefully in context It appears that deaths from measles are falling rapidly. That’s cause for celebration. Measles is pretty deadly, never forget that. For sure, part of this decline is misdiagnosing the real cause of death. But I accept a genuine decline. The researchers found measles deaths worldwide fell from more than 535,000 in 2000 to around 139,000 in 2010. That’s a pretty big fall off (75% drop). We can’t put everything down to faking results. The big question is: how much of the fall is due to the measles vaccination program? How much of it would happen anyway? It is idle (and stupid) to simply dismiss any benefits, just because the measles vaccine seems very likely implicated in toxic nerve inflammations afterwards. If there is good and there is harm, the question is: do they balance? No deaths is good. Would you rather have no deaths and autism? Or would you rather have the deaths than risk that any medical interference might trigger autism? If you think the answer is easy, you either don’t understand the question, or you are ignorant and prejudiced, in my view. It’s a very difficult epidemiological question and it polarizes even holistic doctors.

Apr 27, 2012

Unscientific Vaccination

Keith Scott-Mumby

Recently I was approached by a researcher and asked some broad questions about childhood vaccinations and their consequences. It’s not very efficient to write for just one reader, so I thought I would share it with the many. Here’s my response: My opinion overall is that childhood vaccinations are over rated. We are used to fudging of side effects and overstating the protective effect, so it’s hard to accept the overall supposed social value. There are several obvious problems. First, mother gives the typical child plenty of antibodies for the first few months and to blunder in with vaccinations before the 6th month is pretty unscientific. Secondly, the “schedule” recommended has clearly more to do with making Pharma profits than actual scientifically justifiable needs (many other countries do not administer anywhere near the number of shots that US kids get). It is possible to well protect a child with far fewer shots. I think there is every reason to be extremely wary that vaccinations can cause neurological inflammations and possibly autism. For me, it was one of those clinical things: you know, after the 25th Mom comes in and says “Well, he was fine till has vaccinations and then started to go backwards in development…” you begin to realize there is a pattern building up. That’s how discoveries start. But note that I do not and never have believed that mercury is the problem. I think it’s the organisms and almost certainly the measles virus. I cite Andrew Wakefield’s work and point out that the accusations against him have been proven false, over and over. But orthodoxy will not admit they were wrong: clearly driven by desire to protect the industry, not the children. I do not believe that parents should be advised to avoid having their children vaccinated. With a sensible schedule, I have no problem that vaccination has value, if that’s what the parents want. But parents MUST have the final say, not public employee bullies.

Apr 27, 2012

Unscientific Vaccination

Keith Scott-Mumby

Recently I was approached by a researcher and asked some broad questions about childhood vaccinations and their consequences. It’s not very efficient to write for just one reader, so I thought I would share it with the many. Here’s my response: My opinion overall is that childhood vaccinations are over rated. We are used to fudging of side effects and overstating the protective effect, so it’s hard to accept the overall supposed social value. There are several obvious problems. First, mother gives the typical child plenty of antibodies for the first few months and to blunder in with vaccinations before the 6th month is pretty unscientific. Secondly, the “schedule” recommended has clearly more to do with making Pharma profits than actual scientifically justifiable needs (many other countries do not administer anywhere near the number of shots that US kids get). It is possible to well protect a child with far fewer shots. I think there is every reason to be extremely wary that vaccinations can cause neurological inflammations and possibly autism. For me, it was one of those clinical things: you know, after the 25th Mom comes in and says “Well, he was fine till has vaccinations and then started to go backwards in development…” you begin to realize there is a pattern building up. That’s how discoveries start. But note that I do not and never have believed that mercury is the problem. I think it’s the organisms and almost certainly the measles virus. I cite Andrew Wakefield’s work and point out that the accusations against him have been proven false, over and over. But orthodoxy will not admit they were wrong: clearly driven by desire to protect the industry, not the children. I do not believe that parents should be advised to avoid having their children vaccinated. With a sensible schedule, I have no problem that vaccination has value, if that’s what the parents want. But parents MUST have the final say, not public employee bullies.

Jan 20, 2012

Vaccination Does Work. Let’s Talk About Polio

Keith Scott-Mumby

Despite the continuous storm of ignorant criticisms, the vaccination principle does work. I got cholera when I went to Sri Lanka to help after the 2006 Indian Ocean tsunami. Protection only lasts 6 months but I wish I had taken a shot before I went (remember the heavy arm from that?) Pasadena was in uproar […]

Jan 20, 2012

Vaccination Does Work. Let’s Talk About Polio

Keith Scott-Mumby

Despite the continuous storm of ignorant criticisms, the vaccination principle does work. I got cholera when I went to Sri Lanka to help after the 2006 Indian Ocean tsunami. Protection only lasts 6 months but I wish I had taken a shot before I went (remember the heavy arm from that?) Pasadena was in uproar […] The post Vaccination Does Work. Let’s Talk About Polio appeared first on Dr. Keith Scott-Mumby.

Nov 30, 2011

Not Gardasil For Pity’s Sake

Keith Scott-Mumby

It was too late for 21-year-old Christina Tarsell and 17-year-old Jessica Ericzon. Both healthy, athletic young women suddenly dropped dead shortly after receiving their final injection of Gardasil, a vaccine developed by Merck to protect girls and young women from cervical cancer caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). But when Christina’s and Jessica’s shocked families tried to get the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate a vaccine it had inexplicably fast-tracked through the approval process even though only one percent of all cancer deaths are due to cervical cancer, they hit a brick wall. The Tarsells and Ericzons have been vindicated by new documents just released by the FDA’s Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) under a Freedom of Information Act request filed by Judicial Watch. In just one year – between Sept. 1, 2010 and Sept. 15, 2011 – 26 new deaths and many more severe adverse reactions – including seizures, paralysis, and blindness – were reported in patients receiving Gardasil injections. 

Nov 30, 2011

Not Gardasil For Pity’s Sake

Keith Scott-Mumby

It was too late for 21-year-old Christina Tarsell and 17-year-old Jessica Ericzon. Both healthy, athletic young women suddenly dropped dead shortly after receiving their final injection of Gardasil, a vaccine developed by Merck to protect girls and young women from cervical cancer caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). But when Christina’s and Jessica’s shocked families tried to get the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate a vaccine it had inexplicably fast-tracked through the approval process even though only one percent of all cancer deaths are due to cervical cancer, they hit a brick wall. The Tarsells and Ericzons have been vindicated by new documents just released by the FDA’s Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) under a Freedom of Information Act request filed by Judicial Watch. In just one year – between Sept. 1, 2010 and Sept. 15, 2011 – 26 new deaths and many more severe adverse reactions – including seizures, paralysis, and blindness – were reported in patients receiving Gardasil injections. 

Nov 19, 2011

Bill Gates and Megalomania

Keith Scott-Mumby

Anyone who has ever bought and used (or tried to use) Microsoft products will have little trouble thinking of Bill Gates as a criminal. But did you realize he has joined with an international terrorism movement? Bill Gates has put up another $1 billion to be sure that everyone in the world gets all the main vaccines available, even if they do not want them. He doesn’t give a damn if you have your own point of view. HIS word is what counts. He’s a bully (and a fool). He wants every child on the planet vaccinated. (Note: Gates is not even a doctor, but just some guy who dropped out of college and made a bunch of cash with his crappy software via pushy business practices). Individual choice and the sanctity of parenthood mean nothing to Emperor Gates. He wants you vaccinated and they have a plan for those who refuse… Shoot ‘em! And that’s precisely where it’s going. Gangs of armed thugs, backed by Gates, are roaming the streets in some countries, forcing terrorized parents to get their children vaccinated. 
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