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Apr 8, 2016

Vaccine Scampire Shaken To The Core

Keith Scott-Mumby

I was, truly, one of the world’s first doctors to point out the truth about vaccines and the obvious point that current measles vaccine is dangerous and leads to brain damage (this was back in 1982, before MMR). I wrote about it in 1984 in a book (published 1985). This has nothing whatever to do […]

Apr 8, 2016

Vaccine Scampire Shaken To The Core

Keith Scott-Mumby

I was, truly, one of the world’s first doctors to point out the truth about vaccines and the obvious point that current measles vaccine is dangerous and leads to brain damage (this was back in 1982, before MMR). I wrote about it in 1984 in a book (published 1985). This has nothing whatever to do […] The post Vaccine Scampire Shaken To The Core appeared first on Dr. Keith Scott-Mumby.

Jul 18, 2013

Doctoring Vaccination Facts Instead of Patient Care

Keith Scott-Mumby

A paper just published asserts no association between Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and vaccinations. But some of us say it doesn’t show anything much. Vaccines Not Linked to Guillain-Barre, Asserts 13-Year Trial. That’s what the headline said. But, it wasn’t a trial at all; it was just a review of records. In a paper just published online April 11, 2013, and in the July 15 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, researchers claimed to have examined records spanning 13 years and more than 30 million person-years and found no evidence of an increased risk for Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) after vaccinations of any type, including influenza vaccination. Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? Must be true maybe? Point one to note: the lead author, Roger Baxter, MD, is co-director of the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center, Oakland, California. That’s an immediate red flag. Point two: it’s a retrospective study. It’s easy to manipulate figures from the past… you just choose the ones you like! Point three: causes of this syndrome are largely unknown, but are thought to involve an autoimmune process triggered by antigenic stimulation that results in demyelination and destruction of peripheral nerves. Well, we know for sure, from veterinary studies, that vaccines are a major cause—if not THE cause—of autoimmune diseases in cats and dogs. So that’s a glaring inconsistency in their position: vaccinations cause autoimmune disease. So “causes largely unknown” is being too cute. What was interesting was that they found about two thirds of cases (66.7%) were preceded by a gastrointestinal or respiratory infection, with Campylobacter enteritis being the most common trigger. Also implicated are influenza, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, HIV, and Mycoplasma pneumonia. The trouble is, despite the thunderous sounding numbers in my second paragraph, the researchers looked at just 415 cases. That’s stickpoint number four (these are adding up!) Among the 415 patients with GBS they found (or were they chosen?), only 25 had received any vaccine in the 6 weeks before onset of the disease. The other 390 patients with GBS received no vaccines in the 6 weeks before onset. So in a sense it’s a series of 25! Not enough. Stickpoint number #5. More reassuring is the fact that the researchers also found no cases of GBS resulting from vaccines given in childhood, despite the large number of doses given. These included the oral polio vaccine (1.2 million doses), measles-mumps-rubella (1.6 million), conjugated pneumococcal (1.3 million), live attenuated influenza (69,000), diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (1.9 million), varicella (764,000), Haemophilus-diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (525,000), and Haemophilus B vaccines (1.2 million). It does seem clear that GBS is a disease of older people (50 plus years). BUT… remember these are Kaiser’s own records. The fact that there was no mentioned association could be dumb doctors… or dishonest doctors, who don’t or can’t report accurately. GBS really is rare. But here’s another sticky point: according to the US Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, there is a “background rate” for GBS in the U.S. of about 80 to 160 cases of GBS each week. So how come Kaiser, with huge resources and what was claimed to be 30 million person-years, came up with only 415 cases over a span of 13 years? Is that believable? That stinks of massaging. In any case, as I said, this is such a small series as to be almost meaningless.

Jul 18, 2013

Doctoring Vaccination Facts Instead of Patient Care

Keith Scott-Mumby

A paper just published asserts no association between Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and vaccinations. But some of us say it doesn’t show anything much. Vaccines Not Linked to Guillain-Barre, Asserts 13-Year Trial. That’s what the headline said. But, it wasn’t a trial at all; it was just a review of records. In a paper just published online April 11, 2013, and in the July 15 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, researchers claimed to have examined records spanning 13 years and more than 30 million person-years and found no evidence of an increased risk for Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) after vaccinations of any type, including influenza vaccination. Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? Must be true maybe? Point one to note: the lead author, Roger Baxter, MD, is co-director of the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center, Oakland, California. That’s an immediate red flag. Point two: it’s a retrospective study. It’s easy to manipulate figures from the past… you just choose the ones you like! Point three: causes of this syndrome are largely unknown, but are thought to involve an autoimmune process triggered by antigenic stimulation that results in demyelination and destruction of peripheral nerves. Well, we know for sure, from veterinary studies, that vaccines are a major cause—if not THE cause—of autoimmune diseases in cats and dogs. So that’s a glaring inconsistency in their position: vaccinations cause autoimmune disease. So “causes largely unknown” is being too cute. What was interesting was that they found about two thirds of cases (66.7%) were preceded by a gastrointestinal or respiratory infection, with Campylobacter enteritis being the most common trigger. Also implicated are influenza, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, HIV, and Mycoplasma pneumonia. The trouble is, despite the thunderous sounding numbers in my second paragraph, the researchers looked at just 415 cases. That’s stickpoint number four (these are adding up!) Among the 415 patients with GBS they found (or were they chosen?), only 25 had received any vaccine in the 6 weeks before onset of the disease. The other 390 patients with GBS received no vaccines in the 6 weeks before onset. So in a sense it’s a series of 25! Not enough. Stickpoint number #5. More reassuring is the fact that the researchers also found no cases of GBS resulting from vaccines given in childhood, despite the large number of doses given. These included the oral polio vaccine (1.2 million doses), measles-mumps-rubella (1.6 million), conjugated pneumococcal (1.3 million), live attenuated influenza (69,000), diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (1.9 million), varicella (764,000), Haemophilus-diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (525,000), and Haemophilus B vaccines (1.2 million). It does seem clear that GBS is a disease of older people (50 plus years). BUT… remember these are Kaiser’s own records. The fact that there was no mentioned association could be dumb doctors… or dishonest doctors, who don’t or can’t report accurately. GBS really is rare. But here’s another sticky point: according to the US Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, there is a “background rate” for GBS in the U.S. of about 80 to 160 cases of GBS each week. So how come Kaiser, with huge resources and what was claimed to be 30 million person-years, came up with only 415 cases over a span of 13 years? Is that believable? That stinks of massaging. In any case, as I said, this is such a small series as to be almost meaningless.

Feb 2, 2013

Mumps Vaccination Proved Worthless

Keith Scott-Mumby

I’m not against vaccination, as regular readers will know. I’m just against useless and dangerous vaccination. Even dangerous vaccines, such as that for rabies, have a place, where the disease is hideous and the protection worth the risk. The rabies vaccine does work! If you want to know what hydrophobia looks like (terror of water; one of the symptoms of rabies, see this short video on YouTube: But what about mumps? Hardly a deadly disease in fit children. The worrisome complication is orchitis (inflamed testicles), which can lead to male sterility. Then, the vaccine isn’t notorious (like measles, pertussis and flu). But what’s the point if it doesn’t work? A recent study published in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) reveals that a large proportion of children affected by a mumps outbreak in 2009 had already been vaccinated for the condition in accordance with recommended government guidelines.

Feb 2, 2013

Mumps Vaccination Proved Worthless

Keith Scott-Mumby

I’m not against vaccination, as regular readers will know. I’m just against useless and dangerous vaccination. Even dangerous vaccines, such as that for rabies, have a place, where the disease is hideous and the protection worth the risk. The rabies vaccine does work! If you want to know what hydrophobia looks like (terror of water; one of the symptoms of rabies, see this short video on YouTube: But what about mumps? Hardly a deadly disease in fit children. The worrisome complication is orchitis (inflamed testicles), which can lead to male sterility. Then, the vaccine isn’t notorious (like measles, pertussis and flu). But what’s the point if it doesn’t work? A recent study published in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) reveals that a large proportion of children affected by a mumps outbreak in 2009 had already been vaccinated for the condition in accordance with recommended government guidelines.

Dec 10, 2012

Andrew Wakefield, Me and The British Medical Journal

Keith Scott-Mumby

I got lazy here and am starting by quoting Mike Adams of “Natural News” (www.naturalnews.com) That’s because I want to make separate comments of my own about this topic. Mike loves the conspiracy stuff and does it rather well, so I’ll just bow to him in one of those rare moments when I leave it […]

Dec 10, 2012

Andrew Wakefield, Me and The British Medical Journal

Keith Scott-Mumby

I got lazy here and am starting by quoting Mike Adams of “Natural News” (www.naturalnews.com) That’s because I want to make separate comments of my own about this topic. Mike loves the conspiracy stuff and does it rather well, so I’ll just bow to him in one of those rare moments when I leave it […] The post Andrew Wakefield, Me and The British Medical Journal appeared first on Dr. Keith Scott-Mumby.
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